sack


sack
01. We peeled a whole [sack] of potatoes to make potato salad for the company picnic.
02. The school board has [sacked] a teacher who tried to kiss a 14-year-old student.
03. You can buy a big [sack] of carrots at the farmer's market for only £3.
04. The Premier has [sacked] his Finance Minister over his role in the scandal.
05. Henry Wang in accounting has been given the [sack] for coming to work drunk three days in a row.
06. "The Odyssey" by Homer recounts the story of the Greek heroes who [sacked] the city of Troy.
07. The enemy [sacked] and burned the villages in their path as they retreated.
08. Can you pick up a five kilo [sack] of flour on your way home from work? I want to make some bread tomorrow.
09. Pope Leo the Great was famous for preventing the Huns from [sacking] Rome.
10. In a speech at a Labor Party conference, former British Prime Minister James Callaghan once exclaimed, "Either back us or [sack] us!"
11. A Spanish proverb observes that honor and money cannot go in the same [sack].
12. Santa Claus' [sack] was full of toys for all the good little boys and girls.
13. The monster happily filled his [sack] with bad children, and went home to have a barbecue.
14. In May of 1527, the [sack] of Rome took place, during which time the armies of Emperor Charles V robbed and destroyed thousands of churches, palaces, and historic sites.
15. In 1914, German troops executed over 600 people in the Belgium town of Dinant, and then [sacked] and burnt the town.
16. In 1996, Pakistani Prime Minister Benazir Bhutto was [sacked] by the country's President, following accusations of corruption.

Grammatical examples in English. 2013.

Synonyms:

Look at other dictionaries:

  • Sack — Sack …   Deutsch Wörterbuch

  • Sack — Sack, n. [OE. sak, sek, AS. sacc, s[ae]cc, L. saccus, Gr. sa kkos from Heb. sak; cf. F. sac, from the Latin. Cf. {Sac}, {Satchel}, {Sack} to plunder.] 1. A bag for holding and carrying goods of any kind; a receptacle made of some kind of pliable… …   The Collaborative International Dictionary of English

  • Sack — Sack: Das altgerm. Substantiv mhd., ahd. sac, got. sakkus (»Trauer , Bußgewand aus grobem Stoff«), niederl. zak, aengl. sacc > engl. sack (daneben aengl. sæcc, das die nord. Sippe von entsprechend schwed. säck lieferte) beruht auf einer sehr… …   Das Herkunftswörterbuch

  • sack — Ⅰ. sack [1] ► NOUN 1) a large bag made of a material such as hessian or thick paper, used for storing and carrying goods. 2) (the sack) informal dismissal from employment. 3) (the sack) informal bed. ► VERB informal …   English terms dictionary

  • Sack AS-6 — V1 Beschreibung Status Versuchsflugzeug Besatzung 1 Abmessungen Länge 6.4 m Spannweite 5.0 m Höhe 2.56 m Tragfläche 19.62 m² Gewich …   Deutsch Wikipedia

  • SACK — ist eine Abkürzung für Selective Acknowledgment. TCP SACK ist eine Erweiterung des TCP Protokolls, die für bessere Performance bei Paketverlusten sorgt. SACK ermöglicht, dass bei Paketverlusten nicht der gesamte Inhalt des TCP Windows, sondern… …   Deutsch Wikipedia

  • sack — sack1 [sak] n. [ME sak < OE sacc, akin to OHG sac, Goth sakkus < early Gmc borrowing < L saccus, bag, in LL(Ec), sackcloth garment < Gr sakkos < Sem: cf. Heb sak, Akkadian shaqqu, sackcloth] 1. a) a bag, esp. a large one of coarse… …   English World dictionary

  • Sack — (s[a^]k), n. [OE. seck, F. sec dry (cf. Sp. seco, It. secco), from L. siccus dry, harsh; perhaps akin to Gr. ischno s, Skr. sikata sand, Ir. sesc dry, W. hysp. Cf. {Desiccate}.] A name formerly given to various dry Spanish wines. Sherris sack.… …   The Collaborative International Dictionary of English

  • Sack — Sack, v. t. 1. To put in a sack; to bag; as, to sack corn. [1913 Webster] Bolsters sacked in cloth, blue and crimson. L. Wallace. [1913 Webster] 2. To bear or carry in a sack upon the back or the shoulders. [Colloq.] [1913 Webster] …   The Collaborative International Dictionary of English

  • Sack — Sack, n. [F. sac plunder, pillage, originally, a pack, packet, booty packed up, fr. L. saccus. See {Sack} a bag.] The pillage or plunder, as of a town or city; the storm and plunder of a town; devastation; ravage. [1913 Webster] The town was… …   The Collaborative International Dictionary of English

  • Sack — Sm std. (8. Jh.), mhd. sac m./n., ahd. sac, as. sakk Entlehnung. Wie gt. sakkus, ae. sacc früh entlehnt aus l. saccus, das über gr. sákkos auf assyr. šak̇k̇u Sack, Büßergewand zurückgeht. Auf eine Nebenform mit j führen anord. sekkr, ae. sæcc.… …   Etymologisches Wörterbuch der deutschen sprache